Friday, February 14, 2014

Feedback from Oscar R. From Texas; makes my day!

Feedback from Oscar R. From Texas; makes my day! 

"I decided to drop a line to you just to let you know that I'am amazed by your designs and work. I really admire what you do. But above all, I'am amazed by the fact that you share your knowledge. People think that knowing something that nobody knows makes a difference, but what really makes a difference is to share what you know. Do not worry about all those complaining about the noise in the background, they are not learning anything from you, they are worried about your environment. No doubt, these people do not know how to tie their on shoes. If in the future, I decided to learn how to work with paracord, you will be the main resource. I wish you nothing but success, reaching all your goals in your life."

Written by Kevin Gagne

Written by Kevin Gagne

Friday, February 7, 2014

Paracordist How to Make Perfect Charred Cloth (every time) for Flint and...





Charred cloth is arguablly the worlds best tinder. It weighs next to nothing, yet a small amount can be carried in your survival kit to start a large number of fires. It literally grows hotter and more fierce the harder the wind blows, unlike matches and lighters which struggle in similar conditions. Charred cloth is capable of catching the smallest spark, literally capturing it as a glowing dot in the black sea of cloth. When you see that dot, you need only place it in some secondary tinder, like dried grass, leaves, pine needles or wood shavings; then wave gently back and forth or blow directly into the glowing ember. In short order your bundle will burst into flames.



With this video you will learn how to cook your own batches, perfect every time. I cover all the important details, including those often overlooked in other videos out there. What type of container? How long do you cook it? What type of material to start with? Its all here so watch, learn and go cook!



KIDS, this is not a solo project. Get a parent!

Written by Kevin Gagne

Written by Kevin Gagne

Sunday, February 2, 2014

Paracordist Playlist: How to Make Your Own Firesteel and Tinder 550 Cord Lanyard Kit

I'm proud to offer you this new YouTube playlist: this collection contains all the videos you'll need to create the Paracordist's original Firesteel and Tinder Lanyard Kit. This was once one of my best selling items, and one of my offerings in the early days when I only sold on Ebay. I've discontinued the item due to my inability to find a "maker" to assist with production, and the loss of the primary source for the magnesium rods. Now I've completed the video series that shows you how to make it yourself. This is an awesome project, and a great father/son, parent/child, or scout project that with a little guidance can be very rewarding!

The video shows all the materials needed for the project, many of which can be sourced at my online store at the following links:
Paracord Fid/Lacing Needles
kleen-cut-paracord-scissors
fatwood-stick
individual-blank-firesteel-ferrocerium-rod
Real-deal Made in USA #550 Paracord No-tangle skein
Gorilla Glue and Jute Cord - you local hardware store
Scrapers - we sell the scrapers used for bracelets, and the sugar creek coffin scraper; still working on a fairly priced source for the little carbide strikers.

It is my intention this year to bring all the necessary items into a small "project" kit; stay tuned!

Starting with an informational video demonstrating the use of finished kit, from ferro rod and scraper to the variety of tinders including jute, magnesium and fat wood. The second video teaches the all-important lanyard knot (two strand diamond knot), and doubling it with a loop. The loop can be small for adding the finished item to a lanyard, or large to become the lanyard itself! Video #3 covers fire steel prep and paracord handle installation. The video goes into great detail, revealing the secrets to this item that I've held close to the vest for a couple years now. The last video teaches another Paracordist original, the jute tinder fob. Cut an inch off for enough tinder to start a fire, and the rest will not unravel. Make dozens yourself for pennies each, buying inexpensive jute rolls from the hardware store. Even dip the fobs in wax for an extra long burn!

Written by Kevin Gagne